Robyn Hutchinson features in this week's Loving Leeton Life profile

ROBYN Hutchinson has lived in Leeton for more than 30 years and she can’t imagine ever leaving. 

Mrs Hutchinson came to town in May, 1981 after being an arts student at Charles Sturt University in Wagga from 1976 to 1979. 

At that time she was getting used to the country life after being born and attending high school in Sydney. 

At the end of ’76 I began going out with a young agriculture student who was from Leeton,” Mrs Hutchinson said. 

“I was posted to Albury High School at the start of 1980, then transferred to Griffith High within a month to take up a position as an art teacher.

“In 1981 I married Tim, who had returned to Leeton to work in the family business a few years prior and I was then able to transfer to Leeton High School in February, 1983.”

Growing up, Mrs Hutchinson had many thoughts and ideas on what she wanted to do as a career. 

As a child, I wanted to be an air hostess, an artist or a teacher,” she said.

“In high school, it was an art historian, fashion designer or a children’s author, plus I dabbled with the idea of journalism.

“Apart from four years as a part-time waitress and barmaid while studying, I worked as an art teacher for 36 years, which allowed me to combine most of those areas above.”

Mrs Hutchinson managed to balance out her busy work schedule with family life with Mr Hutchinson and their two children Meg and Mitchell. 

She said her favourite part of living in Leeton was the community cohesion. 

“There are always opportunities for social connection ... from a quick chat … coffee with a friend (or) public social gatherings and downtime with loved ones.”

Mrs Hutchinson has been involved with many groups in Leeton, as well as helping to stage various community theatre productions. 

She said she had no plans to leave Leeton anytime soon, but remarked country and city people weren’t so different from each other when it came down to it.

“Rural towns have a huge place in supporting any region and we must preserve what remains relevant while being open to change that benefits future generations,” Mrs Hutchinson said. 

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